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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the political cliche of low-hanging fruit is something so cartoonishly insensitive, so cartoonishly villainous, you then bring upon us a second political cliche. you have jumped the shark. blocking voluntary efforts by people to get rid of their own guns because they want to voluntarily? that is an exercise in shark jumping. this is the sort of thing that might make sense internally to the nra when they talk about this amongst themselves, but the rest of the country are not picking a fight, but looking for problem solving, nonconfrontational ways to help each other out. trying to block the voluntary tucson gun buyback program does not make sense. the whole reason gun policy is supposed to be seen as so intractable, so unreformable, so politically untouchable and not in america is that the national rifle association has created a mystique about themselves, a mystique about their own power that is supposed to caution anyone who might want to reform gun laws that it just cannot be done. no matter who we are, no matter where we live, no matter how or why we might want to reform our gun laws, no ma
and talk about how genius it is. it's like, you know, it's just -- it's a cliche on top of a cliche crowned with a cliche. i mean, what am i supposed to say? where should i begin? bipartisanship, okay. the book it's based on, doris kearns goodwin's "team of rivals." >> i know what you think of that book. people point out the parallels between president clinton and our current president. here is a question. what lesson would you like the current president to take from the true lincoln in your view? >> well, look, lincoln did a lot more of the success in abolishing slavery if we're going to talk about the great triumph of the lincoln years, winning the civil war, abolishing slavery, 90% of that was idealism, not compromise. the movie shows us the compromise. i'm from kansas. we fought a war with missouri over slavery, but it was against compromise, that border war. this had been going on for decades and decades. if you ask me, barack obama's great failures are his zeal to compromise. he's always looking for a grand bargain. this is why he wasn't able to defeat conservatives when they were tot
. there is an esteemiousness about the red states when suddenly the shoe is on the other foot as the cliche stands. >> when there have been disasters in other areas we have always rushed to appropriate as much money as necessary and when the shoe is on the other foot, it suddenly turned off. and how much -- it took us eight years, pete king, myself, to get a bill passed to take care of the healthcare needs of the first responders and survivors after 9-11. that should have been done automatically in six months. >> eliot: no question about it. congressman jerry nadler, thank you for joining us. good luck in the new congressional session. >> peter welch on obama's diminished hand on the debt ceiling. a couple of things that john boehner might actually have done right. really? you know i'd like to arm our viewers with the ability to argue with their conservative uncle joe over the dinner table. ♪ we were skipping stones and letting go ♪ ♪ over the river and down the road ♪ [ female announcer ] at nature valley we know nature comes to
. the problem being he was born in canada. >> the cliche that young people are liberal and ultra conservative is wrong. but it is true now. and that highlights the challenge. what they need to do is figure out a way to go make a kind of small government market economy-based case to young people, without turning them off. chris: could the cheap investment be a younger candidate like rubio? >> i don't think so. chris: when we come back, the second obama nomination, is it as significant as his first? chris: welcome back. this week's big question, is the second obama inauguration as significant as the first? joe klein? >> it's more significant for republicans because they now know they are a minority party. but we won't have 2 million people in the mall tomorrow. >> fewer people. but if he hadn't been re-elected it would have been very significant that the first black president was only a one-termer. so the fact he's re-elected is important. >> big deal. i think it's bigger. people are still as enthusiastic as they were four years ago. they're going to be out there, not in the same masses as they
't mean to overuse the cliche, but have the conversation. >>> so family members of the newtown school shooting saying it's time to put the politics and side and work to end gun violence. >>> serious of ashley judd about a senate run in kentucky? we'll talk about -- we're back after this. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> after more than
to get out? >> that's the cliche. they are already getting in. we have to answer whether it is a good idea. i think it is one of the best places for yield if you can't get into real estate. but the bottom line is this. tyler, i met new summer of 2007 when the vix was last this low and i remember doing dow 14,000 stories in the fall. and i remember what happened after that. now i'm not saying cliches are always true, but that's the cautionary tale and that's what i saw five years ago. >> 2007. wow. time goes o by. did you hear this, lance armstrong admitted to oprah winfrey he used peds and cheated his way to seven tour de france titles. will this admission, brian, help restore his brand? of course, this is a steroid-free and hormone-free hour at "power lunch." >> yes. as can you tell, my pipes aren't quite what they used to be. his brand, according to the people i talked to, is pretty much destroyed. was not helped by last night. i talked to one sports agent who represent olympic athletes and he said, no way will he ever make another dollar off himself but said every office he goes in
was in fetal position, but, you know, it's kind of cliche, but just one step at a time. just pushing through it was tremendously helpful for me. >> amazing story there. to learn more about tig and her stand up, you can check out her website, tignation.com. >>> super storm sandy compromised some vital police evidence in new york. that could now have major consequences. some criminal court cases may be in jeopardy. >>> but, first, here's dr. sanjay gupta with a quick preview of what's coming up at 7:30 eastern. >>> randi, some surprising research shows that fish oil may help reverse the trauma from brain injuries. i also sat down to learn how to destress and start the year off right. s is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. with three of your daily vegetable servings ♪ ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ dog ] you know, i just don't think i should have to wait
, talk to your fellow parents. talk to your kids, you know, and i don't mean to over use the cliche, but have the conversation. it is not enough to turn off the news and walk away from the tv and go, oh, that stinks. not this time. >> and it is not just republican, democratic, independent. that is the thing that has just blown my mind. that i feel like it is really not about your party right now. >> it is not, it is not. >> i really feel like it is about our children. so i would say that at this moment, that i -- my gut is telling me that we have to continue to talk about the children. they are the future of this country. and it is going to -- you know, they're going to be the next set of parents. and they would want the set of things we want. protection and safety. and you know. i think that is -- >> you know there are much larger cultural and societal issues here. i -- we can't even begin to address those because they're just so enormous. but you have to start somewhere. you have to start somewhere. and i love the idea that this group has put forward saying that sandy hook, you kn
or awesome you are fined and that money goes charity. we don't deal in cliches here. fiscal cliff for the lake superior university, no more fiscal cliff. kick the can down the road. double down, job creators, yolo, i don't know what that is, spoil alert. super food, guru. any of those? >> fiscal cliff, it was not the phrase it was the phrase worked. >> bill: you use it 87,000 times? >> the process went on for 87,000 years. i don't know canadian university wants to ban these words. kick the can down the road. that actually works. >> bill: i never said it. kick the can down the road budget problems, pinheaded debates, armageddon. >> the word that drove me crazy, caution. [ laughter ] >> i hear it every day. every day from this guy. calls, when i hear i go nuts. there is guy going like this. >> bill: you realize that gut field is making his last appearance. what is boneless wings. >> that is chicken wings without the bone. it's now on menus. it's disgusting. yolo is you only live once. that an internet thing. >> for a lot of people that is once too many. >> bill: what is yolo? >> the
. not going to use that cliche, not going to say it that's because it was a fake crisis as the "wall street journal" says today in its lead editorial. the deal congress struck last night could have been done last august. but the politicians in both parties wanted to posture it. setting up phony scenarios for their own personal enaggrandizement. here is really what's going on. president obama has succeeded in raising taxes on every working american. every one of us. those who are doing well will now pay close to 50% income to the feds. those making below $400,000 a year will pay a variety of new obama care taxes and see a 2 percentage point rise in their social security payment. everybody gets hit. if you invest, you will be paying about 9 percentage points more in capital gains and tax. if you die and your estate is worth more than 5 million bucks you will pay 40% of death tax to the feds. president obama is not finished. he wants more from the affluent. >> we can't simply cut our way to prosperity. cutting spending has to go hand in hand with further reforms to our tax code. so that the we
cliches. the republican party wants to stop this government, blame them. will that work its way into the news coverage? will the people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> it seems like that has happened every time. that the republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made, because they have been doing a bit of foot-dragging. so he is definitely laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in the press conference, which i think people will resonate with, which is this whole idea, if you go out and buy an expensive bill, when the check comes, you can't refuse to buy the bill. he is likening that to refuse tolerate the debt limit. it resonates with people and they can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> just to check, glenn, do you think people in the tea party think that they're paying the bill or not paying the bill, or do you think they're saying yes or no to spending, the way they look at it? >> oh, yeah. i think what they think is they're lookin
to pull together and all had to be together and keep being together. you know, the most obvious cliche that comes to mind, and he would have put it more articulately and more memorably is to not let the perfect be the enemy of the good, not miss the forest for the trees. these are not the most innovating or exciting sort of messages, but it's very important to have a few people at or near the top of the conservative movement's leadership who believe in and preach these things and who ask people, ask their fellow activists and conservative intellectuals to remain focused on the need to win a majority of the american people and to govern. "national review," as a very intellectual magazine throughout its existence -- and i think probably even more so in its early years, the '50s and '60s -- very much needed, i think, bill buckley, managing editor priscilla buckley and every other major person there acknowledged that they very much needed a man just like bill rusher to serve as a political eyes and ears, as a political counselor, as a link between "national review"-type people. as rusher t
the mindless cliche. this really puts it all in perspective. but, obviously, no one gains any perspective because they're right back to their same view of sports immediately thereafter. i said, if we're really looking for perspective, a bit of it can be found. and i was trying to imply there that an aspect of this, a bit of perspective on a larger and more complex problem can be found in what whitlock said. >> but the way it was read was, okay, you're quoting someone else and you're kind of making a plea for gun control, but not in your own name and you only had 90 seconds. looking back, you had a lot of time to think about this. was it a bit of a busted play? could you have handled it better? >> i could have handled it better and i think given the amount of time that i had, i would have been better off just crafting my own short statement and kind of realizing that it could not have been as complete as what i wanted it to be. there's also, a little bit of inside baseball or football inside this case, too. but i tried three times to contact jason whitlock. there are any number of witnesse
have gone over the world. it is almost a cliche where we go, as reporters, you had to the dump. there's a documentary made about the dump in egypt. i went to the smoking mountain in the philippines and as reports were part of the pushing the regime out because of inequities they showed. and to see this in my own country? shocking. we have an army of people who grew through the garbage. i still get chills when i think about it. >> thank you for being with us. the award winning directing to go, their latest on "redemption" is academy award domination in the documentary short division. [captioning made possible by democracy now!]
. >> a lot of people say it's a cliche, but your life literally does pass before your eyes. >> she says he yanked her by the hair and put a gun to her head. >> there are times i still feel, you know, that piece of metal. >> diana says she will never forget the chilling words he said. >> do as i say and you won't get killed. that really struck with me. i kept repeating to him i have a grandson. i have a grandson. >> as employees scrambled to bring the robber a bag filled with cash police began arriving at the scene. >> he first saw we were surrounded, so i thought he would just kind of shoot me, shoot the other girl and shoot himself because he was not getting out of there. >> fortunately none of the victims lost their lives. espinoza grabbed a bank teller. he held a gun to her head and walked her outside, but when he slipped on a patch of ice, she took off running. police shot and killed him on the spot. diana says it was the thought of her family that helped her get through the ideal, but ironically in the days and months that followed diana's trauma took a toll on her children as well. >
conference today not only didn't include any talk of compromise, but he wheeled out the old nasty cliches about the republicans not caring about the old and the sick. let's welcome a former obama campaign aide joining our panel. kate obenshain and robert costa. kate, besides talking about how republicans hate the sick, hate the young, hate everybody -- >> disabled. >> yeah, disabled. sorry about that. he also made sure to include that he wants more taxes. more taxes. obama care taxes are already kicking in. we just had a tax increase on investors and small businesses. can you beat that, more taxes? >> this should come as a surprise to nobody, larry. obama's goal is not some sound economy when he -- as his legacy, his goal is as to fundamentally transform america where we have a vastly expanded size of government. he won't talk about cuts except little ones on the side. but he wants to continue to expand government. he doesn't care about deficits. he's not going to deal on this. >> you know, a couple of times during the news conference, i was interested in this. president obama said to con
's a failure to pay bills, don't look at both sides. none of the malarkey and cliches. will that work its way into news coverage? will people begin to buy the president's shaping of the battlefield? >> well, it seems like that has happened every time. that republicans get more of the blame when we have these sorts of, you know, end of the night deals that have to get made. because they have been doing a bit of foot dragging. so he definitely is laying down the rhetoric. i think one of the things he said in that process conference which i think people will resonate with which is this idea if you go out and buy an expensive meal, you can't when the check comes refuse to pay the bill. he a likening that to a refusal to raise the debt ceiling. it resonates to people who can understand the debate in their own language in some ways. >> glenn, do you think the people in the tea party are paying the bill or not paying the bill or saying yes to spending? the way they look at it. >> i think what they think is they're looking at a different set of polls that say a significant portion of the electorate c
still call no-brainers if that's not too bad a cliche. people ought to get serious penalty penalties if they buy a gun that they intend to pass on to a criminal. people ought to be able to pass a background check which takes about 90 seconds out of their lives. he is in the big middle of this country where 800 mayors are, where about 80% of the country is. and the nra is increasingly marginalizing itself. i can't quite figure out why. >> you see, my issue this, with the political part of this is i can understand certain republican congressmen and women who are in red states and who genuinely believe that actually these proposals are wrong. but there are a number of republicans i think who actually would be persuaded on some of these arguments, but who won't even think about going there because of fear of retribution from the nra. and as for the democrats who apparently are threatening to stand up to the president on this, i just don't believe them. i think they're only doing that for political expediency. >> well, in the weird thing about this is if you actually look closely at the n
of a cliche that he looked you in the eyes and says no, but in all the time i had known him, he was always very adamant and aggressive in saying he hadn't dop doped. we were having a conversation, toward the end of all this, and i said, look, i got to tell you, i think you have doped. i'm pretty sure you have doped, and i'm at a point where i have to say something pretty soon. and he didn't deny doping. and there was -- you know, it sounds a little weird, but in context, there was just a moment where i was like, oh, he really did it. and that was -- there were plenty of other, you know, plenty of other people who had spoken up. there was always a lot of evidence, but that was the moment where i absolutely knew he had doped. >> what was his response to that cover story? >> he was mad. i got sort of the angry, screaming phone call. and you know, it's just -- of course, i would. and i thought that would be the last time i would ever talk to him. and then maybe three or four months later, we started having communication again, which i also found fascinating. >> betsy andruw, she was in a hospi
cliche into that final quarter of the year and you saw the market largely shrugged it off. >> brown: a butte is more picturesque than the cliff, but go ahead. yes. >> yes, indeed. so i feel that investors at least are not bothered about this. they see this as a game of chicken going up and down pennsylvania between the white house and congress. and much of this has been kicked down the road effectively for a couple of months. we do know that we have an unsustainable budget deficit situation but on the flip side you have economists like paul krugman out there saying do not worry about the budget deficit, this is not the time to be slashing public spending. as you saw, that actually helped push that economy into decline in the final quarter. that was a big variable in that. so this is a huge debate. but on balance what you're seeing is a lot of the unexpected has surprised the positive. you mentioned housing, housing is not just virtuous in that it helps homeowners and construction workers out there and material suppliers, it's also helping the banking sector which, after all, gorged
are up 35% last year. so i think everything is fine and i think that, you know, the old cliche is don't fight it and i think as the public realizes, and people realize the market is not going to come back. >> it's been great having you again. we appreciate your patience and we look forward to having you back soon. guys, leave us with a thought from each of you if you would. set us up for next week. we are at the point in the market we haven't been for five years. s&p 500 hanging out. industrial average point away from its all-time high. >> there is a lot to look forward to and you know a lot of it will be about what transpired on our network for the last 45 minutes. herbalife will be on everybody's lips even though that is not the economy. economy is doing better than we expected. we talked about german business confidence and so forth. but there certainly will be a new focus on herbalife, scott. and that's going to be my focus into next week. >> there's one thing that does trouble me. what troubles me is that we are all bullish here. everybody i talked to is bullish. despite how bull
to say it is, such a cliche, kicking the can down the road again. >> we have to deal with this, this is wasteful spending. we have an element no one is talking about i want to introduce on the show. you have exponential growth of debt due to compounded interest. we have structural problems the way we handle our money system. this is something that we're going to have to address sooner or later. you can kick the can down the road but we'll still have debt. we have to deal with the underlying issues how these debts are created. cut the wasteful spending but also look at the, at the system that we have that causes the debt to grow exponentially because of the come pounded interest. melissa: peter, i'm worried we're in real trouble here. seems like we're not tackling this problem. >> we are in real trouble. we're to the point where raising taxes alone will not put us in a position where we can get our debt and deficit growth under control. you know if we raised everybody taxes by 25%, we wouldn't raise enough taxes to solve the deficit problem but yet we throw the economy into a te
is as a ocd self editor is how often really cliches will show up. and to me that is something i think if you just took even a mediocre speech, trimmed out the troeps, the comforting words, you know, then, you know, suddenly the thing, there are not enough words. you have to substitute in. maybe those are more truthful. but like in orwell's politics in language, certain are markers for insincerity and for an agenda. >> the word frankly, for instance. which is my favorite. >> honestly. >> yeah. >> the sort of familiar catch phrases you almost don't even read in a speech anymore. but i think what you notice in that clip is there was nothing. there was literally not a single one of those that was an originality of an expression and like that goosebumps the quickness with which a certain rhetorical trope came home. wow, that was perfect. that was fast. you know, that is something -- that's hard to talk about, i suppose. but language is power. and, you know, in that, you can really see it. >> he said that obviously he gave that speech after the reverend wright stuff blew up. one of the things that
will be on display. let go of the cliche of the boys' club. among the 100,000 or more who flooded south beech this weekend, meet two women, some of the most outspoken superfans here. >> we bleed blue and gold. >> reporter: molly's father, a former halfback for notre dame. >> my dad played football for notre dame. my grandfather played for knute rockne. >> reporter: for her, football is more than game. it's a tradition. a way of life. >> notre dame is about family. friendship. faith. it's that community that unites us and sustains us. that's why there's such a great following. >> reporter: janice bleeds football, too. hers runs alabama crimson. her father played for the tide. she's one of four generations of family who have attended the university. >> i've loved football all my life. not just because my dad was an all-american and i was raised in it. it's just an awesome sport. a good way for us all to come together. >> reporter: the only thing they disagree upon who will hoist the coveted trophy. >> go irish! >> roll, tide! >> and you can watch tig best of all games tonight on espn, full cove
that environment. it becomes cliche' to stand in front of the building every day with your home boys, drinking and smoke a blunt. this is the reality of it. this is what our youth think is the way of life right how. a lot of them don't have the initiative to get out and go find their appointment and this is why we're trying to bring this abroad. >> but violence, specifically, what did you think about it as a way of dealing with someone either doing something to someone you loved or -- >> well, i mean, there was a time when i was a very violent individual at one time. and a lot of times you don't think about what you're doing to someone to hurt them when the thought is in process. it's like if it happens there's a reaction. this is the mentality and now it's even more so with the video games and the kids that sit there all day and play video games and it becomes easy to pull the trigger in the video game and in real life, people think that it's the same thing but it's not because you're dealing with the flesh of of a human life. >> i think it's important. there's a risk here that we put it all
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)